Author Archives: fishforthefutureeu

Do not support overfishing in the EMFF

Next week (23 October) members of the European Parliament will on the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF).

In an email circulated to all MEPs, the rapporteur Alain Cadec (France, EPP) asks for support for amendments to reintroduce subsidies for building new fishing vessels and modernising engines.

The Fish for the Future bureau has sent MEPs the following reply to Mr Cadec’s email:

Dear Colleague

At political group meetings this week we will consider the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) – the report from French PPE MEP Alain Cadec.

Last February, 502 MEPs voted IN FAVOUR of reforms to the Common Fisheries Policy that can give Europe a sustainable fisheries policy, restock the seas, and end discards.

Alain Cadec voted AGAINST.

The cross-party ‘Fish for the Future’ group welcomes his call now for sustainable fisheries but there are three issues of real concern.

First, the Cadec report would allow billions of euros to be spent on ‘fleet renewal’ (Article 32b), although we still have too many boats chasing too few fish. Spending public money in this way was stopped in 2002 because it made worse the problem of overfishing. The money can be used instead to strengthen the fishing industry and help ports in difficulty.

Second, the Cadec report would allow money also to go towards engine replacement (Article 39.1.a). But modern engines can do the job more effectively than old ones and so increase the catching capacity of the fishing fleet without creating any new jobs. Our aim should be to promote a sustainable fisheries policy with more fish in the sea and more money for fishermen – not to provide subsidies for a few.

Third, we need to put more money aside for data collection. We simply don’t know enough about the state of fish stocks – except that in some places they are in a very bad way.

The Parliament can unite behind many proposals in the Cadec report. But to support the reformed Common Fisheries Policy we need to make these changes.

With regards,
Christofer Fjellner (EPP)
Ole Christensen (S&D)
Nils Torvalds (ALDE)
Isabella Lövin (Greens)
Anna Rosbach (ECR)
Mikael Gustafsson (GUE/NGL)
BUREAU OF THE ‘FISH FOR THE FUTURE’ GROUP

Beginners’ Guide to the Reform of EU Fish Subsidies

On 30 May, the European Parliament and the EU Member States reached agreement on the main issues in the reform of the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP).

One last regulation remains in the fisheries reform package: that governing the money. The fisheries committee in the European Parliament will vote on 10 July 2013 on the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF).

Fish For the Future is a cross-party group of MEPs who want to end overfishing and rebuild fish stocks. We want public money to be used to help all fishermen – for example by improving data collection, supporting the transition to more selective fishing, and supporting fisheries dependent communities by adding more value to fisheries and by diversifying their activities into other maritime sectors. We do not want public money to be used to build new fishing vessels or other measures that increase fishing capacity.

Share our guide to EU fisheries subsidies (easy sharing below the image) – and tell your MEP to support Fish For the Future.

Beginners' Guide to the Reform of EU Fish Subsidies – Fish For the Future

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<div style="clear:both"><a href="https://fishforthefutureeu.wordpress.com/2013/07/01/beginners-guide-to-the-european-maritime-and-fisheries-fund/"><img align="center" src="https://fishforthefutureeu.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/990px_fff_2_emff-online.jpg " title="Beginners’ Guide to the Reform of EU Fish Subsidies – Fish For the Future" alt="Beginners’ Guide to the Reform of EU Fish Subsidies – Fish For the Future" border="0" /></a></div><div>Courtesy of: <a href="http://fishforthefuture.eu/">Fish For the Future</a></div>

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Design and production of this leaflet was funded by BalticSea2020. Fish For the Future is responsible for the content of the leaflet.

Beginners’ Guide to the Common Fisheries Policy

The EU fisheries policy may seem complicated, but it is actually pretty simple: we must fish less now so we can fish more tomorrow. The infographic below explains the Common Fisheries Policy in five minutes.

Important discussions are taking place in the European Parliament right now and there are divisions between MEPs (Members of the European Parliament) across all national delegations and political groups.

Fish For the Future is a cross-party group of MEPs who want to end overfishing and rebuild fish stocks. We are fighting against those who prefer the short term benefit of allowing fishermen to catch the last remaining fish over ensuring European fishermen a long term future.

Short term kindness will kill the fishing industry. Make your voice heard. Share our guide (easy sharing below the image) – and tell your MEP to support Fish For the Future.

Beginners' Guide to the Common Fisheries Policy – Fish For the Future

Embed This Image On Your Site (copy code below):

<div style="clear:both"><a href="https://fishforthefutureeu.wordpress.com/2012/11/06/beginners-guide-to-the-common-fisheries-policy/"><img align="center" src="https://fishforthefutureeu.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/fff_online_infographic_990px.jpg&quot; title="Beginners’ Guide to the Common Fisheries Policy – Fish For the Future" alt="Beginners’ Guide to the Common Fisheries Policy – Fish For the Future" border="0" /></a></div><div>Courtesy of: <a href="http://fishforthefuture.eu/">Fish For the Future</a></div>

Print:
Download a PDF suitable for printing (English)
Télécharger la version française
Deutsche Version herunterladen

Sources: Download the list of sources

Design and production of this leaflet was funded by BalticSea2020. Fish For the Future is responsible for the content of the leaflet.

The Beginners’ Guide was originally produced in English. The Fish For the Future group is not affiliated to FishFight, who take responsibility for the translation into German and French.

Fish for the Future poster

Click image to view larger version.

Embed This Image On Your Site (copy code below):

<div style="clear:both"><a href="https://fishforthefutureeu.wordpress.com/2011/05/10/fish-for-the-future-posters/"><img align="center" src="https://fishforthefutureeu.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/fffposter1_web_big_1500x2097.jpg&quot; title="Fish For the Future Infographic" alt="Fish For the Future Infographic" border="0" /></a></div><br/><br/><div>Courtesy of: <a href="http://fishforthefuture.eu/">Fish For the Future</a></div>

Welcome to the Fish for the Future website

Hi and welcome to the website of the “Fish for the Future” group of Members of the European Parliament dedicated to reform of the EU Common Fisheries Policy.

To your right you will see the text of Written Declaration 17/2011 that we are encouraging all MEPs to sign.

Over the next few weeks we will add information about particular fish, ways you can get involved in the campaign for CFP reform and news about how the campaign is going.

Fish for the Future Group

FISH FOR THE FUTURE’

A cross party campaign group within the European Parliament

OBJECT AND PRINCIPLES

Object:

To promote reform of the EU Common Fisheries Policy with the aim of ensuring that we have more fish in the sea and so more jobs for fishermen.

Members of the group recognise that:

Fish represent a major part of the diversity of life and are an essential source of protein for billions of people across the world.

EU fish stocks are in many cases at precariously low levels as a result of fishing policies that are unsustainable.

Europe’s seas are capable of supporting fish in much larger numbers than currently exist, but the recovery of stock is prevented by excessive fishing and policies that pay little regard to local circumstances and promote the discard of fish.

Taking account of the views of the fishing industry and other stakeholders, the EU must adopt a long term, regionally-sensitive, science-led approach and introduce policies that promote sustainability. In some cases this may require a temporary reduction in tonnes of fish caught.

Our aim should be to ensure that our seas support fish stocks capable of delivering maximum sustainable yields to secure a healthy fishing industry, to benefit coastal regions and islands acrossEurope, and to meet the needs of future generations.

As a major importer of fish the EU has a global responsibility to promote ecologically sustainable fisheries, and must ensure in particular that its Fisheries Partnerships Agreements fulfil the same criteria as those of fisheries in EU waters.